Rosenborg Castle

King Christian IV designed this Dutch Renaissance style castle himself as a summer residence. The next three generations of kings lived here until King Frederik IV erected Frederiksberg Castle in 1710. From then on, Rosenborg Castle was only used for occasional visits and certain official functions.

The most spectacular aspects of this castle, is the fact that after 1710 it became a sort of storehouse. You know how us commoners have a storage room under the stairs, an attic, or even a garage full of boxes and what looks like random junk? Well, Rosenborg is where the royal family stores their… heirlooms, including crown jewels, furniture, statues, porcelain, and thrones are kept.

As early as 1838, these royal collections could be viewed by the public. There are 24 rooms you can visit, ranging from the small Writing Closet and Porcelain Cabinet, to the Long Hall. After viewing the incredible artworks in these rooms, you can move down to the vaults to see the crown jewels, ceremonial arms, barrels of Rosenborg Wine, ivory and amber object, and many fascinating swords… After spending time in the vaults, for those somewhat uncomfortable with the closeness of the walls down there, you can head out to the balcony and maybe catch the military practices, or head out to the King’s Gardens.

The entry to the castle and vaults is quite inexpensive: 80Dkr for adults, which includes any special exhibits they may have, 50Dkr for students with a valid ID, and free of admission for those under 17. Photo Permission costs an extra 20Dkr, and Guidebooks are available for the tour for a 10Dkr deposit, or to take along home for 25Dkr.

As per usual… prepare for an onslaught of photographs…

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A beautiful castle, cut off from the King’s Garden by a moat, these lions guard the bridge.

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After the bridge you can head left to the balcony that overlooks the military barracks, and if you’re really lucky the (quite good-looking) men will be out practicing the changing of the guards or marching.

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You then continue around the left side of the castle, to a beautiful mini-maze, and around to the main entrance…

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Once you’ve bought your ticket, and possibly a guide and a permission sticker for photos, you can head into the main castle, after watching the main guards for a while…

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Shall we enter the castle? At the door, where you show your admission ticket, you can borrow a guide book to see what every numbered piece in the castle is, as well as it’s history…

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The first room, Christian IV’s Winter Room, reminds me of my old room… The walls are filled, literally, with paintings; Each one more beautiful than the last… Hidden to one side you will find his Writing Closet. After the Winter Room, you are led through various halls and through smaller rooms…

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Of course you cannot forget the excessive artwork around the fireplaces and even on the ceilings… Very Baroque in my opinion…

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Art, art, and on the second floor? More beautiful, if somewhat extravagant, art…

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I was absolutely fascinated by the amber chandelier…. No idea why, but I had to take lots of pictures of it, so beautiful.

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(Above: Stairwell to the third floor) The third floor was by far my favourite. The Long Hall shows two separate throne setups, one on each side of the hall, and walls lined with very old tapestries depicting fleets of ships at war…

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In one side room we found what looked like a broom-closet office, though obviously more snazzy…

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On the opposite side of the Long Hall is another small room…. the Porcelain Room. Guess what that room is filled (and I mean filled) with…?

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Walls and tables filled with porcelain. They have the Glass Cabinet just off the Long Hall as well, but it is close to impossible to take proper pictures in there…

Back in the Long Hall:

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And another beautiful mural, and, in my opinion, this one is by far the nicest…

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So by the time you head back down the stairs, you’re in desperate need of space, so catch a breather outside, watch the guards go back and forth in slow motion, or laugh at how some of them push people aside gently without breaking stride… Then head into the vaults….

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Ah! Rosenborg Wine…. *swoon*

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Amazing Amber and Ivory pieces…

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And then… we move into the deeper vaults…

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Once you leave the vaults, if you’re anything like me, you’re desperate for an open space. This is the perfect time to head over to the main entrance for a coffee, or back over the bridge and into the King’s Gardens.

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Absolutely a place you can spend the day, and not even too bad when the weather is its usual Danish self…

And in answer to a comment I got in person: No, this is not a lot of pictures, this is a mere 77 out of the 314 I took in the two days I spent on the Castle grounds. I hope you enjoy them, I tried to pick out only the very best for you.

I’ll check in soon from beautiful Copenhagen…

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